Connecting Tradesmen, “The Last Mile” in construction innovation

12 thoughts on “Connecting Tradesmen, “The Last Mile” in construction innovation”

  1. Stop piece work pay and give workers the proper time to complete a task without trying to race the clock to maximize their income. It seems every production job I’ve been on with piece workers building the project ends up with defects…

    1. Thanks for the comment, Bill! I think that's part of it. As one of the most tech-savvy subcontractors/tradesmen I know, how do you keep your crew aware of the crucial elements for proper assemblies? (Acceptable temperature ranges, preparation of substrates, etc.)

  2. I tend to stay with products I know and have worked with before so the crew knows what to expect. By installing the same few products every week we are accustomed to the materials and have experience with them in different seasons, temperatures and moisture conditions.

    More importantly, I pay my crew by the day…whether it takes 4 hours to perform a part of an installation or 9 hours to do it they get paid a full (plus OT) day. I have the same guys working for me now 4+ years. No production pay, no piece work…give them time to do it right.

    If we are considering bringing in a new product, we'll have the manufacturer's rep do a training class, field oversight and inspections so we are sure of what we are doing before turning it loose on a client.

    1. Thanks for the info. I have noticed that some manufacturers do seem to be very willing to provide guidance and training these days. Which makes sense, because they have both a warranty and reputation to uphold. And that is especially true with the deck manufacturers, whose products have been involved in so many lawsuits.

      The problem I see is that it isn’t possible for every manufacturer to get involved with every project. How can we make it easier for the trades to get easy access to the exact information needed for each assembly on a given project?

  3. I tend to stay with products I know and have worked with before so the crew knows what to expect. By installing the same few products every week we are accustomed to the materials and have experience with them in different seasons, temperatures and moisture conditions.

    More importantly, I pay my crew by the day…whether it takes 4 hours to perform a part of an installation or 9 hours to do it they get paid a full (plus OT) day. I have the same guys working for me now 4+ years. No production pay, no piece work…give them time to do it right.

    If we are considering bringing in a new product, we'll have the manufacturer's rep do a training class, field oversight and inspections so we are sure of what we are doing before turning it loose on a client.

  4. (Below is a comment that Bill Leys left. I transitioned AEC Quality .com over to a new commenting system, and apparently this comment didn't get picked up…)

    Well I think the information is available to us if we want it; just go online and every mfg has their technical bulletins published, MSDS, etc. Smart phones, tablets makes it easily available on the job site.

    The question really is how do we get tradesmen who THINK they know how to do something to read the tech bulletin and follow the instructions.

  5. (Below is a comment that Bill Leys left. I transitioned AEC Quality .com over to a new commenting system, and apparently this comment didn't get picked up…)

    Well I think the information is available to us if we want it; just go online and every mfg has their technical bulletins published, MSDS, etc. Smart phones, tablets makes it easily available on the job site.

    The question really is how do we get tradesmen who THINK they know how to do something to read the tech bulletin and follow the instructions.

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