Smart homes of the future may just as readily respond to instructions sent by text, as the voice-powered interfaces that dominate the early entrants to the market for the Internet of Things in the home. Amazon, Google and Apple all have technologies largely relying on speech recognition, but as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg discovered after installing an extremely sophisticated voice-powered smart home system, not everyone is comfortable with that style of user interface.

Jeremy Wagstaff, writing for Reuters:

Facebook (FB.O) founder Mark Zuckerberg, for example, was working on Jarvis, his own voice-powered AI home automation, and found he preferred communicating by text because, he wrote, “mostly it feels less disturbing to people around me.”

A small Singapore-based firm called Unified Inbox is working on the challenge:

At Unified Inbox, Ruckert looks ahead to being able to communicate not only with one’s own appliances, but with machines elsewhere. Bosch executives in Singapore, for example, have demonstrated how a user could ask a smart CCTV camera how many people were in a particular room.

As famous inventor James Dyson stated in a recent interview:

For me, the future is making everything happen for you without you being particularly involved in it.