ArchDaily’s list of the 9 worst architectural lawsuits and disputes

Thomas Musca, writing for ArchDaily, compiled a list of nine examples of the worst architectural claims, disputes and lawsuits:

What did Pritzker Prize winner Frank Gehry get when he designed the Stata Center, an exuberantly whimsical academic complex for MIT? A very large check, plus a major lawsuit, alleging negligence and breach of contract due to rampant leaks, mold, cracks, drainage problems and sliding ice. Sometimes the most inspired designs can go awry. And when they do, some clients lawyer up. Here are 9 fascinating examples.

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Here’s what you need to know about the new AIA A201 contract language and insurance requirements

Kenneth W. Cobleigh, managing director and counsel of AIA Contract Documents, writing for Construction Executive, highlighted some of the major impacts that the 2017 revision to the fairly ubiquitous A201 contract language might have on projects:

The single most significant 2017 revision to the A201 Family is the creation of an Insurance and Bonds Exhibit to accompany the key owner-contractor agreements.

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An “engineer” by any other name would smell as sweet

Apologies to Mr. Shakespeare, but it seems that right now across the internet, a lot of attention is being paid to how the word “engineer” is defined. Merriam Webster, a fairly respected dictionary, offers three definitions of the word, engineer:

  1. “a designer or builder of engines”
  2. “a person who is trained in or follows as a profession a branch of engineering”
  3. “a person who carries through an enterprise by skillful or artful contrivance.”

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Reservation of Rights, and the need for your own attorney during a dispute

Melissa Dewey Brumback, a partner at North Carolina-based Ragsdale Liggett PLLC, recently tackled the subject of what to do as design professional if you have received a “Reservation of Rights” letter from your insurer as part of a claim against your firm. As she explains: Reservation of Rights (ROR) letters are sent for a variety … Continue reading Reservation of Rights, and the need for your own attorney during a dispute

Intellectual property spat over flesh detecting table saws heading to Federal Appeals Court

When I was working with the facilities management staff at San Diego’s iconic Air & Space Museum on the path to LEED Certification under the Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance program, I got a chance to see a really cool tool that could on its own improve safety statistics for construction workers. Especially for the … Continue reading Intellectual property spat over flesh detecting table saws heading to Federal Appeals Court

“Smart” garage door opener manufacturer remotely disables customer’s equipment over dispute

Brave New World, indeed. One of the drawbacks to the Internet of Things (IoT), enabling devices to communicate with other devices, is that connected devices could be compromised and controlled by folks with nefarious motives.

But what if that nefarious actor was the device’s manufacturer reacting poorly to a customer’s negative review? Continue reading ““Smart” garage door opener manufacturer remotely disables customer’s equipment over dispute”

AECforensics.com is Back! (Be sure to check out the new Daily Edition…)

After almost exactly two years, AECforensics.com is back to dissecting the latest issues impacting quality and risk management in the built environment. And what’s more, there’s now a Daily Edition featuring the top curated news for professionals in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry.

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Could self-healing bio-concrete reduce future construction defect claims?

As nerdy as it probably sounds, I can’t even begin to put into words how excited I am for products like this. Back in January of 2014, I wrote about the winners of the 2013 Cradle to Cradle Product Innovation Challenge, including the inventors of self-healing bio-concrete. Cracked concrete is a frequent allegation in construction defect claims. Continue reading “Could self-healing bio-concrete reduce future construction defect claims?”

San Diego: With a shortage of housing, why is it so hard to get a housing project going?

My colleague Alan Nevin provides a much-needed clarity to understanding the development challenges in San Diego in this piece, which originally appeared in the Daily Transcript. There is a study yet to be published that found that up to 39% of the cost of a residential housing unit in the San Diego region is strictly … Continue reading San Diego: With a shortage of housing, why is it so hard to get a housing project going?

Hipsters passing the bar may lead to uptick in “artisanal lawyering”

So this is satire, just to be clear… John Frank Weaver, writing for the always hilarious McSweeney’s, offers a wonderfully hand-crafted glimpse into the imaginary life of an Artisanal Attorney. Weaver opens his piece with the question, “Are you tired of large corporate law firms making the same cookie cutter litigation?” (I know that I … Continue reading Hipsters passing the bar may lead to uptick in “artisanal lawyering”