Stanford researchers working on regional “seismic observatory” using existing fiber optic networks

Researchers at Stanford are pleased to report the following: Thousands of miles of buried optical fibers crisscross California’s San Francisco Bay Area delivering high-speed internet and HD video to homes and businesses. Biondo Biondi, a professor of geophysics at Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, dreams of turning that dense network into an … Continue reading Stanford researchers working on regional “seismic observatory” using existing fiber optic networks

Net-Positive Earth Moving Equipment?

Massive earth moving equipment ranks among some of the heaviest and most costly machinery in the world, outside of experimental particle physics, of course… Not surprisingly, the mostly diesel-powered mammoth vehicles typically employed for major infrastructure projects require a great deal of that diesel fuel to get the job done. Considering that in many such … Continue reading Net-Positive Earth Moving Equipment?

Oroville Dam interim report highlights the importance of codes and standards

When the Oroville Dam failed earlier this year, it prompted a review of numerous major infrastructure projects throughout California. The news is not good, as it is clear that many billions of dollars of tax-funded projects were designed and constructed to withstand significant seismic events. That’s because we’ve learned that our previous codes and standards … Continue reading Oroville Dam interim report highlights the importance of codes and standards

Tracking the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire through its plumbing and sewage infrastructure

Annalee Newitz wrote an awesome piece for Ars Technica on a subject that most people would probably not care much about: Ancient Rome’s plumbing and sewage system: The ancient Roman plumbing system was a legendary achievement in civil engineering, bringing fresh water to urbanites from hundreds of kilometers away. Wealthy Romans had hot and cold … Continue reading Tracking the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire through its plumbing and sewage infrastructure