According to Catalin Cimpanu of Bleeping Computer:

Since mid-September, a new IoT botnet has grown to massive proportions. Codenamed IoT_reaper (Reaper for this article), researchers estimate its current size at nearly two million infected devices.

According to researchers, the botnet is mainly made up of IP-based security cameras, network video recorders (NVRs), and digital video recorders (DVRs).

Researchers from Chinese security firm Qihoo 360 Netlab and Israeli security firm Check Point have spotted and analyzed the botnet as it continued to grow during the past month.

The way the virus works is that it scans the internet for unmatched devices and then forcibly takes control of the device. Once enough devices are added to the attacker’s command-and-control infrastructure, the devices can then be used to perform coordinated Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks on targeted servers and networks.

Almost exactly one year before researchers discovered the Reaper IoT botnet the Mirai botnet was discovered, which took down most of the internet for much of Europe and North America.

Since job site cameras, connected to the internet, are fairly ubiquitous throughout the construction industry, it is possible that some construction projects are already inadvertently part of the Reaper botnet.

How about that for a risk that few project managers have considered?

Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, a technical school in Zurich, reports on a fascinating project that several ETH Zurich professors are collaborating with some outside business interests on. It involves both robots AND 3D printing.

At the DFAB HOUSE, four construction methods are for the first time being transferred from research to architectural applications. Construction work began with the Mesh Mould technology, which received the Swiss Technology Award at the end of 2016; it was developed by an interdisciplinary team and could fundamentally alter future construction with concrete. Here, the two-metre high construction robot In situ Fabricator plays a central role; it moves autonomous-ly on caterpillar tracks even in a constantly changing environment. A steel wire mesh fabricated by the robot serves both as formwork and as reinforcement for the concrete. Thanks to the dense structure of the steel wire mesh and the special composition of the concrete mix, the concrete stays inside the grid and does not pour out.

The result is a double-curved, load-bearing wall that will characterise the architecture of the open-plan living and work-ing area on the ground floor. A Smart Slab will then be installed – a statically optimised and functionally integrated ceiling slab, the formwork of which was manufactured using a large-scale 3D sand printer.

Smart Dynamic Casting technology is being used for the façade on the ground floor: the automated robotic slip-forming process can produce bespoke concrete façade mullions. The two upper floors, with individual rooms, are being prefabricated at ETH Zurich’s Robotic Fabrication Laboratory using Spatial Timber Assemblies; cooperating robots will assemble the timber construction elements.

Here’s video of the process:

 

 

Disruption is a word that is overused in Silicon Valley, and elsewhere in the tech world. The idea is that sometimes a new player comes along with an approach to doing things in such a radically different way that it disrupts the entire industry.

With advancements such as building information modeling (BIM), virtual/augmented reality (VR/AR), semi-private cloud-sharing of information, drone photography, the Internet of Things (IoT), prefabrication and/or modular construction, 3D printing, robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), and so on and so forth… — the construction industry of the next couple decades will look absolutely nothing like the previous couple decades.

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Over at Adweek, Jason Snyder has a great piece on who the real target demographic might be for marketing: robots.

Whoever is closest to the consumer controls the conversation. But it’s not you who’s closest—it’s the machines. The good news for marketers is that unlike fickle, demographic-defying consumers, robots are consistent—staying true to their programming. For now anyway. And talking to them requires speaking their language—and increasingly that language is less about understanding 1’s and 0’s and more about simple, normal words.