R.I.P. Grant Imahara

While Mythbusters was a little cheesy at times, it always remained true to itself — using science to demonstrably prove flawed assumptions. One of the core Mythbusters, Grant Imahara, who studied electrical engineering at USC, sadly passed away at the age of 49. According to the Hollywood Reporter: Imahara died suddenly following a brain aneurysm, The … Continue reading R.I.P. Grant Imahara

New book highlights scientific Fieldwork Fails that are often quite amusing

Emily Lipstein, writing for Gizmodo Australia reported the following: After long years of research, your efforts have paid off: the archaeological site you're digging in has turned up a stash of rare, striking bones, no doubt the beginning of a groundbreaking discovery. Only then, you find the KFC wrapper, revealing that this "ancient burial ground" … Continue reading New book highlights scientific Fieldwork Fails that are often quite amusing

Quality goes up, mistakes go down when people know their work is being evaluated

Quantum mechanics, at first glance, seems like it has nothing in common with human behavior. But what if human behavior was actually influenced by quantum mechanics? One of the most mind-blowing experiments I recall learning about in my advanced physics classes is the famous double-slit experiment. Without getting too deep in the weeds of quantum … Continue reading Quality goes up, mistakes go down when people know their work is being evaluated

Do Scientists really need their own social network?

Science is hard work. However, science is arguably among the most critical pursuits of humanity — one might even be so bold as to claim that along with the arts, science represents the very manifestation of our humanity. The roots of scientific exploration and study lie not so much within the individual accomplishments of any … Continue reading Do Scientists really need their own social network?

Rats need pants, and other scientific research subjects of questionable worth

It is Awards season again—no, not the Emmy's or even the Country Music Awards or whatever—I'm talking about the always entertaining Ig Nobel Prize ceremony held last night at Harvard. Every year, for the pasts 26 years, researchers in unique and obscure niches are awarded prizes celebrating their scientific achievements. Just like the real Nobel … Continue reading Rats need pants, and other scientific research subjects of questionable worth