How architects can better manage the risk associated with California’s increased code requirements

Although the pandemic has had the greatest impact on humanity in quite some time, in the building industry, we were already facing numerous challenges before the quarantine started. 2020 has also been a year for some rather stringent code changes in both residential and nonresidential construction, particularly in California. With new code requirements, including the … Continue reading How architects can better manage the risk associated with California’s increased code requirements

Do we really need more new buildings?

A radical concept that I think deserves further consideration: There was nothing all that special about the generic campus of low-slung boxy offices and parking garages that Google first leased and then acquired in 2006. It was renovated and adapted with stimulating new interiors by Clive Wilkinson, alongside office landscape specialists DEGW, that reflected what was then an unusually … Continue reading Do we really need more new buildings?

Repeat after me: Sustainable design and construction is no guarantee for quality

I am an outsider. Among construction defect and quality management professionals, my involvement with green building makes me stick out like a sore thumb. Among green building professionals, advocates and activists, my responses to claims that green buildings are better quality leads to some very awkward moments. Without adopting more sustainable practices, existing design and … Continue reading Repeat after me: Sustainable design and construction is no guarantee for quality

This just in: Chesapeake Bay Foundation lawsuit over defective “green” building will go forward

Last September, I shared an in-depth case study on the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Phillip Merrill Center called, The LEED Platinum Case Study Nobody Wants You To Read. Summary: One of the world's greenest buildings according to the USGBC was constructed with improperly sealed engineered wood components, leading to water intrusion that compromised the structural integrity … Continue reading This just in: Chesapeake Bay Foundation lawsuit over defective “green” building will go forward

The LEED Platinum Case Study Nobody Wants You To Read

A non-profit organization, dedicated to preserving the natural beauty of Chesapeake Bay, commissioned a breath-taking facility that would eventually become the first LEED Platinum building in the world. Improperly protected engineered wood components led to water intrusion and compromised structural integrity. The building cost $7-million to build. The estimated cost of repair, according to a … Continue reading The LEED Platinum Case Study Nobody Wants You To Read