Back in June of 2015, a relatively unknown company by the name of Daqri introduced an augmented reality-enabled hard hat that they dubbed the Smart Helmet.

While there clearly is not yet massive adoption among the trades for a more than $1,000 hard hat, that doesn’t mean Daqri has ceased innovation. In fact, as Construction Junkie reports, the company unveiled its next wearable device purpose-built for the architecture, engineering and construction industry: Smart Glasses. (Not to be confused with Google Glass, of course…)

Here is a video showcasing Daqri’s products at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show:

And here is a case study produced by Autodesk and Mortensen showcasing the Smart Helmet:

Learn more about the entire product line at Daqri’s website.

Sanjoy Malik, writing for Green Biz, discusses an issue that is something most building owners, developers, operators and other stakeholders aren’t too familiar with. However, for those of us with experience in improving/optimizing existing buildings, the issue can be a real deal breaker.

What’s the problem? Since de-regulation of the energy utilities, the data produced by rate-payers is now proprietary. Without readily available access to both quantitative and qualitative data regarding the energy usage of existing buildings of certain sizes and use types, it is extremely difficult to develop new strategies for improving efficiency. (You can’t improve what you can’t measure…)

Malik proposes a new business model mirroring the Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model that many technology providers have successfully exploited in the past decade or so:

The Energy-data-as-a-service (EDaaS) model holds great promise for the industry. There are various firms providing services within the energy industry that could benefit from a single source of energy data, including:

  • Accounting and finance. Many firms provide energy budgets, pay utility bills and forecast future costs and progress towards reduction goals. These activities require significant process-oriented operations and analysis capabilities. Adding the acquisition of energy data may be too much effort for these firms.
  • Energy optimization. Energy performance in many buildings can be improved using more detailed data, analyzing it and creating statistical models that include other variables such as weather and occupancy. Firms that provide such analytics products can scale their operations by using a standard energy data provider.
  • Energy procurement and supply. Energy purchasing decisions are complex and firms that provide these services typically invest in analysis of historic bills and bidding and negotiating capabilities to find and secure the best prices on energy. By using a third-party for the raw energy data, they can more quickly make decisions about the procurement strategy for their clients.
  • Sustainability and compliance. Many firms are investing in greater transparency around energy performance, using sustainability reports and other public information disclosures. Many large cities are starting to mandate that building owners get Energy Star scores to benchmark their properties. Both of these processes can be expedited by more quickly and systematically collecting energy data via a third party.

Ever since GoPro tried to launch their new line of drones for their adventure enthusiast market, problems have tarnished the normally stellar reputation for solid, quality-built imaging technologies. Forbes’ Ryan Mac wrote a thorough analysis of the saga, with the provocative headline, “The Sky Is Falling For GoPro.”

The article opens with a story of a disappointed customer’s experience:

Six days after the release of GoPro’s first-ever drone in October, Brian Warholak was itching to get airborne. As an employee at a Chesapeake, Va.-based government contractor, Warholak, 43, had few opportunities during the workweek to fly his new toy. But on Friday, he left his desk early, unpacked his GoPro Karma from its carrying case and set it on a manicured lawn near the company parking lot.

In the video of Warholak’s aeronautic excursion, the drone lurches upward, pausing for its master to pan the attached camera. What it captures initially is unremarkable: a nondescript office building and a mostly empty car park. Then, two minutes into the voyage, the device bricks. Its four propellers cut out and the drone begins a five-second, 170-foot freefall toward earth. It smacks a few tree branches on the way down for good measure and lands camera upward to capture its owner rushing to the crash. “F***, now where is the rest?” Warholak is heard saying on the video. “Son of a b****.”

Here’s the video in question:

The upside to using modern electronic/smart door security systems in hotels across the globe is that it is really easy to check guests in and out, replace lost keys, and prevent former guests from reusing their key to gain unauthorized access.

The downside is that the smarter these security systems become, the more susceptible they become to hacking. (more…)

As the construction industry becomes more reliant upon technology, we must follow the proven examples of other industries and adopt standards for exchanging information.

It started with CAD. All of a sudden there was a way to create drawings electronically that could improve the precision of the design process and reduce the repetitive labor associated with manual drawing/drafting. As software developers saw the opportunity for creating CAD programs for the AEC industry, a bunch of different options sprouted up, each with its own unique file format. Quickly it became apparent that it was in the industry’s best interest to standardize those file formats to make it easier for design teams comprised of multiple distinct entities to collaborate.  (more…)

This whole Samsung Galaxy Note 7 debacle would be really hilarious, if it didn’t represent a major risk to life and limb for consumers.

Adding insult to Samsung’s injury, and in an effort to prevent injury to both consumers and postal workers, Samsung took the unusual step of sending out flame-proof containers for people to return their devices as part of the recall. According to Ars Technica:

The kit contains a special “Recovery Box” that’s lined with ceramic fiber paper to provide some protection against incineration. Samsung warns that some people will have a bad reaction to this lining, so the recovery kit also includes some gloves to protect your hands. They don’t appear to be flame retardant, so if your Note 7 is currently ablaze, we’d suggest minimizing contact with it.

For a little background, after initial reports of spontaneous combustion of the flagship devices started popping up, Samsung started to replace devices. But then, the replacement devices began exploding and causing injuries themselves.

So on Monday, October 10th, Samsung took the embarrassing but responsible step of recalling ALL Galaxy Note 7 devices, ending production. The move will likely cost the company up to $9.5-billion in lost sales, eating up nearly $5.1-billion in lost profit.

 

My son was just a few weeks old when I got my Blackberry. He turns 15 in two weeks. Risking repetitive stress injury to my thumb, that device allowed me to keep a $500-million R&D campus construction project moving forward, while still being able to go to doctor appointments and spend time with my young family.

It was when I successfully declined a meeting invitation and then rescheduled that meeting for a later time—from the comfort of a blanket on the beach—that I finally realized what a profound impact the Blackberry’s functionality would have on people’s lives. It took Apple showing the world what was truly possible with mobile technology, and Blackberry’s repeated missed opportunities have now led to its downfall, according to CNET:

BlackBerry’s decision closes a significant chapter in one of the most storied franchises in the phone industry, and it puts an even higher premium on the company’s shift of focus to software and services. BlackBerry was among the high flyers in the early days of mobile phones. Legions of “CrackBerry” addicts in the white-collar workforce tapped away at its trademark physical keys in the early 2000s.

Like many other companies, BlackBerry failed to anticipate the rise of Apple’s iPhone and of phones running Google’s Android software, which knocked BlackBerry back on its heels for years. Consumers have paid little attention to its phones despite the company’s attempts to modernize the BlackBerry software and, in a last-ditch effort last year, to embrace Android.

It’s been an unstoppable descent. In 2009, BlackBerry controlled one-fifth of the phone market, just behind Nokia. Today, it holds a tiny fraction of 1 percent, according to Gartner.