Property Brothers, Jonathon and Drew Scott, are jumping from the fire of the small screen into the frying pan of real estate development and custom homebuilding with their latest venture, Dream Homes by Scott Living.

Lucy Cohen Blatter, of Mansion Global, has more in an exclusive interview with the brothers:

Jonathan, a professional contractor, takes care of construction and design, while Drew, a licensed broker, manages the selling on their shows. But the brothers have moved their empire beyond the small screen. In 2015, they launched Scott Living, a home furnishings and decor line.

And at the beginning of this year, they moved into the luxury marketplace, announcing the launch of Dream Homes by Scott Living, which invites luxury home buyers to purchase home designs created by them. Clients can shop from a portfolio and customize layouts to suit their needs, a trend that is becoming more popular. They decided to launch the company “to showcase another passion of ours,” they told Mansion Global, “creating one-of-a-kind dream homes on an epic scale.”

The interview covers a range of topics, but one thing that jumped out at me was when Drew was asked what he considered the most important amenity to include in a modern luxury home:

Smart tech. This can tie into literally any aspect of your home to make life more enjoyable… Technology is revolutionizing what it means to have a little luxury in our closets. Software that lets you scroll through visuals of all your shoes, accessories and outfits. If you can’t see it, you won’t wear it! Even cameras that give you a 360 degree view of your outfits in a full length interactive mirror.

So, there’s that.

Skilled labor shortages in the construction trades have had a major impact on the industry.  It drives costs up, can result in delays, but worst of all, it threatens the integrity of the built environment.

Perhaps the biggest issue contributing to the skilled labor shortages is the lack of young people entering the industry. For the past several decades in the US, educators have strongly pushed students away from vocational training and skill development to focus on college prep as the exclusive option following graduation from high school.

That isn’t likely to change anytime soon. The next problem the construction industry has in terms of skilled labor is how to train and educate those that do find themselves in the trades. And for that, most education techniques still go back to hundreds of years ago when guilds ruled various trades and workers apprenticed under masters to learn on the job.

That’s why I think this 360 VR video from the Eastern Illinois University represents what the future of education looks like for the construction industry:

To view the video properly, you’ll need the Chrome web browser on a computer, or use VR goggles with your mobile device.

Quantum mechanics, at first glance, seems like it has nothing in common with human behavior. But what if human behavior was actually influenced by quantum mechanics?

One of the most mind-blowing experiments I recall learning about in my advanced physics classes is the famous double-slit experiment. Without getting too deep in the weeds of quantum physics, the experiment basically demonstrates that a particle behaves one way when there is an observer, yet behaves completely differently when not actively observed. In other words, whether or not someone is observing the experiment directly impacts the outcome of the experiment.

If particles behave differently when being observed, what about living, breathing human beings? Does quality of human work product improve or decline when workers know they are being watched? (more…)

All this week I’ve been observing destructive testing at a high rise. At a building across the street, workers are taking down scaffolding from a 20+ story condo project after repairs were made to the building’s exterior.

More than a few times over the past several days my colleagues and I have observed workers not tied off to proper fall protection performing extreme acrobatic feats while carrying fairly large and unwieldy sections of scaffolding using both hands.

Watching these hard working folks putting their life on the line with every step has been eye-opening  and terrifying, while at the same time providing me a real sense of gratitude that my job isn’t nearly as risky.

And then I saw this: 

(Via Construction Junkie)

Within the construction defect industry, we sometimes joke that the repairs proposed by some parties represent a much more costly approach than is truly necessary to solve a particular situation. You might hear comments like “that’s the Cadillac repair” or “how can this be so expensive — what are they trying to do, gold plate the building to keep leaks out?”

So when I learned that there was an artist using gold to fill cracks as part of a new installation, I couldn’t help but take a closer look. Allison Meier, writing for Hyperallergic, highlighted the work of Rachel Sussman inspired by an ancient Japanese art form known as kintsukuroi. (more…)

Who even knew that there was a contest to see who can demolish stuff the best? Canadian firm Priestly Demolition, Inc. (PDI) won the 2016 World Demolition Award for best project for their masterful work on a project in Ontario, Canada.

Due to environmental concerns, a bridge needed to be removed without using explosives. In just a week’s time, braving subzero temperatures, PDI successfully dismantled the bridge. Construction Junkie’s Shane Hedmond has more:

The original Nipigon River Bridge was constructed in 1937 as a simple steel deck truss bridge. 37 years later, in 1974, steel girders replaced the truss and it had remained the same ever since. In 2013, a $106 project was started that would replace the old bridge with a new 4 lane bridge and close down the old one. PDI was contracted as the demolition company responsible for removing the old bridge.

The Nipigon River is the largest tributary of Lake Superior and, because of that, there were many environmental concerns for the river wildlife and surrounding habitats. Not only that, but the company had to worry about the recently constructed first half of the new bridge which sat directly adjacent to the old bridge. The old bridge stood 100 feet (30m) above the water and spanned 827 feet (252 meters). Without being able to disturb the water below, the team ultimately decided to jack the bridge up and use hydraulic rollers to move the girders off of the supporting piers and onto land.

Without further ado, I present a 24-minute long video produced by PDI showing the process in depth:

Guess it all depends on the criteria being used to define what “perfect” really means, but if there is one person on this planet of ours that might have a clue what the perfect wall is, it is Joseph Lstiburek. At the wonderfully named Let’s Fix Construction website, building scientist extraordinaire Lstiburek contributed an article with the bold title, The Perfect Wall.

In truth, the article goes well beyond the scope of describing what a “perfect” wall might be, and could instead be titled, The Perfect Building Envelope. Besides walls, Lstiburek also diagrams the components of the perfect roof, the perfect slab, as well as providing several variations on wall design options.

Getting back to the definition of what a perfect wall actually is, here is the introduction:

The perfect wall is an environmental separator—it has to keep the outside out and the inside in.  In order to do this the wall assembly has to control rain, air, vapor and heat. In the old days we had one material to do this: rocks. We would pile a bunch or rocks up and have the rocks do it all. But over time rocks lost their appeal. They were heavy and fell down a lot. Heavy means expensive and falling down is annoying. So construction evolved. Today walls need four principal control layers—especially if we don’t build out of rocks. They are presented in order of importance:

  • a rain control layer
  • an air control layer
  • a vapor control layer
  • a thermal control layer

A point to this importance thing here, if you can’t keep the rain out don’t waste your time on the air. If you can’t keep the air out don’t waste your time on the vapor.

You’ll definitely want to read and bookmark the full article. Just be prepared — this is some seriously geeky building science content. But what else would you expect from the founder of the Building Science Corporation?

Garrett Huffish, writing for Digital Trends, reports that the first on-site 3D-printed residential home was built in Russia for about $10,134:

Printing the self-bearing walls, partitions, and building envelope took the machine 24 hours to complete. The final result is the first house printed as a whole with an area of 409 square feet.

Erecting the house during the coldest time of the year in Russia was no easy task. The concrete mixture used in the printing only sets right in temperatures above 5 degrees Celcius. Meanwhile, the outside temperature was sitting at minus-35 degrees Celcius. A simple solution was found by setting up a sealed tent around the construction site to keep it warm enough.

Here’s a video:

Learn more at Apis Cor’s website.

During the tail end of my junior year of high school, my family and I temporarily relocated to Southwest Missouri.

We were fleeing the cratering of the entire construction industry in Southern California, hoping to catch the extraordinary boom in construction taking place surrounding Branson. Although the school year only had a few weeks left, I transferred to the local high school in an attempt at full immersion.

I kid you not, at least once a day while living and attending school in Missouri, someone would ask me about all the earthquakes in California. Students and teachers alike were astounded that people (in their minds) put their lives on the line daily, not knowing when the next rumbling of the earth would occur spelling certain destruction.

I on the other hand was shocked at how easily the locals could accept the likelihood of tornados, and listened in amazement to stories people told of their near misses and lost property caused by weather.

Which is why the latest report from the US Geological Survey is so mind-blowing. The LA Times has more:

The earthquake risk for Oklahoma and southern Kansas is expected to remain significant in 2017, threatening 3 million people with seismic events that can produce damaging shaking, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey forecast released Wednesday.

The seismic risk is forecast to be so high that the chance of damage in Oklahoma and southern Kansas is expected to be similar to that of natural earthquakes in California, USGS scientists writing in the journal Seismological Research Letters said Wednesday.

The cause for the dramatic uptick in seismic activity in the Midwest?

The earthquakes are thought to be the result of disposal of wastewater deep underground following fracking, a method to extract petroleum. Injecting wastewater deep underground is not thought to trigger earthquakes everywhere — in North Dakota, for example — but is widely believed by scientists to be a problem in Oklahoma.

Housing shortages abound throughout the modern world, and in the UK, the situation is not much different than here in the US. Also not much different: substantial claims of defective construction due to cut corners in an effort to meet demand.

In fact, the country’s National House Building Council, which provides 10-year warranties covering most newly constructed homes, reportedly paid out £90-million (US$110,852,100) to homeowners in 2015-2016. According to the Guardian, this is nearly triple the amount paid to resolve claims from a decade before. Here’s more on the story:

This week the Guardian reported that Bovis is set to award people who live in some of its newbuild homes a total of £7m in compensation, in response to claims that houses have faulty plumbing or wiring, missing insulation, and other serious defects. Some people say they were offered money to move into homes that have not been completed. When the news broke, the Bovis share price fell by 10%, wiping £100m off its stock market value.

This is just one part of a bigger story of complaints about Britain’s construction giants – and what happens when the rush to build leads to corners being cut and houses left either unfinished or deeply defective. On social media there are hundreds-strong groups telling their personal stories: “The toilet leaked into the living room and when my plumber came to fix it he found the toilet had not been installed correctly”; “having my kitchen ripped out for the second time”; “no insulation in roof”; “mould growing all over the house … too dangerous too live in as I have asthma”.

Meanwhile, the pressure is on to build as many new homes as possible. Even if it is behind on its targets, the government still wants a million to have been put up by 2020. The year 2015 saw a big jump in completed builds: 142,890 homes were finished, a 20% year-on-year increase. Last year the number was put at more than 150,000.