A reminder of just how much progress the AEC industry has made with regards to safety

Just a few short months ago, in May, two construction workers were killed due to unsafe working conditions at a site in Navi Mumbai, a suburb of sorts to the Sai Mannat business hub in India. While the deaths should have prompted outrage and collective demand for improving safety conditions, that’s just not the way … Continue reading A reminder of just how much progress the AEC industry has made with regards to safety

Augmented Reality goes to trial, wins (for now…)

David Kravets, writing for Ars Technica: A judge on Thursday declared as unconstitutional a local Wisconsin ordinance mandating that the makers of augmented reality games get special use permits if their mobile apps were to be played in county parks. The law—the nation’s first of its kind—was challenged on First Amendment grounds amid concerns it … Continue reading Augmented Reality goes to trial, wins (for now…)

Listen: Slate podcast features a profile of the forensic analysis process

Slate’s podcast, Working, profiles various professionals in an attempt to understand what certain unique jobs entail. In a recent episode, Jacob Brogan profiled Mark Hughes, a self-described “cell technical specialist” who performs forensic analysis of batteries: The lab where Hughes works is an enormous facility, coming in at around 85,000 square feet. It includes equipment … Continue reading Listen: Slate podcast features a profile of the forensic analysis process

New museum in Sweden celebrates the failure necessary for progress and innovation

Perhaps it should come as little surprise that Sweden’s new Museum of Failure sounds like the perfect museum for a person like me. Jason Zasky, writing for Failure Magazine (which is now one of my favorite subscriptions), reports the following: The Museum of Failure isn’t on any list of the Top Things to do in … Continue reading New museum in Sweden celebrates the failure necessary for progress and innovation

Why is Japan’s construction industry substantially more productive than that of the US?

Financial Times’ Matthew Klein has proposed an interesting alternative theory about the skilled labor shortage in the US that has impacted all sectors of the construction industry, but especially the residential market. He posits that by looking at homebuilding data in Japan, the implication is that the US isn’t facing a labor shortage so much … Continue reading Why is Japan’s construction industry substantially more productive than that of the US?

More skilled craftsman retiring and taking their skills with them

Skilled labor shortages affect more than just the construction industry. As craftsmen in various trades and industries from the Baby-Boomer generation retire or change professions, there aren’t too many younger apprentices to train or to otherwise transfer that knowledge. The brain drain could have drastic impacts on modern conveniences that most of us take for granted. Case … Continue reading More skilled craftsman retiring and taking their skills with them

Quantifying the Return on Investment (ROI) of Construction Safety Programs

Safety First! That’s been the culture in construction for most of my life, but as we all know, safety was not always the highest priority in decades past for our industry. Back in the 70s, when OSHA, various trade associations, and — perhaps most importantly — the insurance carriers began cracking down on lax safety … Continue reading Quantifying the Return on Investment (ROI) of Construction Safety Programs

Google’s secretive drone research and development program has unintended consequences

Google X — now just “X” — is a secretive skunkworks subsidiary of Alphabet, the parent company that used to be simply known as Google. The company is famous for its “moon shot” experiments where big risks hopefully lead to big payoffs. But are the costs really worth it? Julie Bort, at Business Insider, reveals … Continue reading Google’s secretive drone research and development program has unintended consequences