Just wear your damn mask, and other risk management strategies

The last post I published here at AECforensics.com was a recap of the 2019 West Coast Casualty Construction Defect Seminar. As I write this in the last days of June, it makes me a little sad to think about the conference we should have had this year in May, but obviously could not. For me … Continue reading Just wear your damn mask, and other risk management strategies

Proof of Concept: Ultra-thin, insulated concrete roof with embedded PV

Once again, the incredibly brilliant minds at Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zurich) have announced innovative processes and materials for a better built environment. Phys.org has the story: Researchers from ETH Zurich have built a prototype of an ultra-thin, curved concrete roof using innovative digital design and fabrication methods. The tested novel formwork system will be … Continue reading Proof of Concept: Ultra-thin, insulated concrete roof with embedded PV

Video: Work complete on foundation of the world’s next tallest building

Construction Junkie's Shane Hedmond shared a video marking completion of work on the foundation at "The Tower" in Jeddah: The final height of the building has yet to be announced, which is common for supertall buildings, as those involved want to avoid tipping their hand to fellow supertall building developers. It’s expected that the tower … Continue reading Video: Work complete on foundation of the world’s next tallest building

Canada: Crumbling & cracking concrete cladding causing concern

Vancouver, British Colombia played host for a couple decades to a dramatic uprising of concrete-clad condos that permanently altered the city's skyline. Developers rushing to sell units to (oftentimes  foreign) investors and empty-nesters cut corners, leading to years of litigation followed by tougher standards and improved oversight — particularly regarding the building envelope. Despite the … Continue reading Canada: Crumbling & cracking concrete cladding causing concern

Should buildings keep weather out, or let it in?

Kevin Nute, writing for the Washington Post: A building’s primary purpose may be to keep the weather out, but most of them do such an effective job of this that they also inadvertently deprive us of contact with two key requirements for our well-being and effectiveness: nature and change. In the 1950s, Donald Hebb’s “arousal … Continue reading Should buildings keep weather out, or let it in?